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Wild & Eco

Despite its small size, due to the highest rates of biological endemism in plants or animals, Sri Lanka is included among the top five biodiversity hotspots in the world. Of the ninety-one species of mammals found in Sri Lanka, the Asian elephants, sloth bear, leopards, sambar and wild buffaloes, engages the attention of the majority of the wildlife enthusiast. Yet, the rarest mammals of Sri Lanka are the red slender Loris, Toque Macaque, and Purple-faced Langur, who, according to the IUCN, are included in the ‘Red List of Threatened Species’.

The diversity of Lanka’s wildlife is celebrated and conserved at many wildlife sanctuaries found around the country. With a history of protection and compassion extended to all the living beings, Sri Lanka’s first animal sanctuary had been recorded as far as third century BC- by the time of the arrival of Arhant Mahinda in the country and introduced  Buddhism.

  • Meanwhile, the Indian Ocean around Sri Lanka is home to large families of cetaceans including the mighty blue whales, sperm whales and lively dolphins. Altogether, 26 species of cetaceans rule the waters surrounding the country, making it one of the best locations for whale and dolphin watching.
  • Sri Lanka has one of the richest diversity of amphibians in the world, containing over 106 species of amphibians of over 90 of which are endemic. The country has long claimed to have the highest amphibian species density in the world with 85% of endemicity ratio in Amphibians, especially in the Sinharaja rainforest, one of the eight UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Sri Lanka.
  • Besides the mighty elephants and rare amphibians found in the country, it is also a paradise for bird watching, and are a glory of the Sri Lanka’s wildlife. Boasting nearly 433 bird species of which 233 are resident Sri Lanka, and 20 are endemic species while another 80 species have developed distinct Sri Lankan races, compared to their cousins in the Indian mainland.
  • To enjoy the behavior of animals, and to get into fun and knowledge-filled travel, there are 22 national parks in the country accessible for visitors; the Yala National Park, Kumana, Willpattu, Galoya and Udawalawa wildlife sanctuary are the larger once. Among the smaller wildlife sanctuaries are the Maduru Oya, Bundala, and Wasgamuwa National Parks. Horton Plains, which is a UNESCO Heritage in the central highlands also offer breathtaking trekking trails.
  • The Peradeniya Botanical Gardens in Kandy hosts a fine display of local and foreign flora of Sri Lanka including the rarest of palm and orchid varieties. Also, there are several other botanical gardens that host dry zone and wet zone vegetation; mirijjawila dry zone park, Seethawaka wet zone park, Hakgala gardens are the most popular places that one can relax with families.
Meanwhile, the Indian Ocean around Sri Lanka is home to large families of cetaceans including the mighty blue whales, sperm whales and lively dolphins. Altogether, 26 species of cetaceans rule the waters surrounding the country, making it one of the best locations for Dolphin and Whale Watching
Sri Lanka has one of the richest diversity of amphibians in the world, containing over 106 species of amphibians of over 90 of which are endemic. The country has long claimed to have the highest amphibian species density in the world with 85% of endemicity ratio in Amphibians, especially in the Sinharaja rainforest, one of the eight UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Sri Lanka.
Sri Lanka has one of the richest diversity of amphibians in the world, containing over 106 species of amphibians of over 90 of which are endemic. The country has long claimed to have the highest amphibian species density in the world with 85% of endemicity ratio in Amphibians, especially in the Sinharaja rainforest, one of the eight UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Sri Lanka.

Besides the mighty elephants and rare amphibians found in the country, it is also a paradise for bird watching, and are a glory of the Sri Lanka’s wildlife. Boasting nearly 433 bird species of which 233 are resident Sri Lanka, and 20 are endemic species while another 80 species have developed distinct Sri Lankan races, compared to their cousins in the Indian mainland.

To enjoy the behavior of animals, and to get into fun and knowledge-filled travel, there are 22 national parks in the country accessible for visitors; the Yala National Park, Kumana National Park, Willpattu, Galoya and Udawalawa wildlife sanctuary are the larger once. Among the smaller wildlife sanctuaries are the Maduru Oya National Park, Bundala, and Wasgamuwa National Parks. Horton Plains, which is a UNESCO Heritage in the central highlands also offer breathtaking trekking trails.
To enjoy the behavior of animals, and to get into fun and knowledge-filled travel, there are 22 national parks in the country accessible for visitors; the Yala National Park, Kumana National Park, Willpattu, Galoya and Udawalawa wildlife sanctuary are the larger once. Among the smaller wildlife sanctuaries are the Maduru Oya National Park, Bundala, and Wasgamuwa National Parks. Horton Plains, which is a UNESCO Heritage in the central highlands also offer breathtaking trekking trails.
The Peradeniya Botanical Gardens in Kandy hosts a fine display of local and foreign flora of Sri Lanka including the rarest of palm and orchid varieties. Also, there are several other botanical gardens that host dry zone and wet zone vegetation; mirijjawila dry zone park, Seethawaka wet zone park, Hakgala gardens are the most popular places that one can relax with families.